Galactic Gazette header
Previous
Next

Visual Astronomy Display: July 2020

Image of the solar activity from NASA's time lapse video

The Wolbach Library wishes good health to everyone during this unprecedented global crisis. Watch ten years of solar activity in this time lapse video from NASA; NASA, ESA, & JAXA unveil a satellite data-driven COVID-19 dashboard; Seeker explains the innovations of the new Perseverance Mars rover; Why does this young…

Poem from a Volunteer

The following poem was posted on one of the Talk Board pages for our Zooniverse project, Star Notes. Jean Laurie was kind enough to allow us to post her poem here. Harvard Ladies Order StarsFor Williamina Fleming From Argentina come stars packed in wooden crates,minute gleams, silver trails of hydrogensnapped…

Astronomers in a Chemists’ War

In August 1914, as the ‘Great War’ began, a pair of French scientists started working on a machine to detect enemy artillery fire using recorded sound. Charles Nordmann, the leader of the two and a career astronomer, was best known for his failed attempts at the turn of the century…

Sir Arthur Eddington and The World War One Eclipses

Just weeks after the start of World War One, German astronomer Erwin Finlay-Freundlich led an expedition into Russian-controlled Crimea to photograph the total solar eclipse on August 21, 1914. An American expedition, led by William Wallace Campbell from the Lick Observatory, arrived in Kiev with similar intentions. Earlier that spring,…

June Zooniverse Newsletter

June Star Notes Update Hi everyone! Sam here, one of the researchers behind Star Notes. We hope that you are all staying safe and healthy during this time. First off, we stand with Zooniverse’s commitment to fight systemic racism in STEM by supporting the Black Lives Matter and #ShutdownSTEM movements….

The “First and Second Civil War Comets”

Horace Parnell Tuttle’s career in astronomy began when failing eyesight forced his older brother, Charles Wesley Tuttle, to abandon his own fledging astronomical career. Charles redirected his academic pursuits, enrolling in Harvard Law School, and Horace replaced his older brother at the Harvard College Observatory. Educated in the early days…

Thaddeus Lowe and The U.S. Army Ballooning Corps

On April 20, 1861, Thaddeus Lowe left Cincinnati, OH, with plans to travel to Washington D.C. in the basket of a balloon he’d named the “Enterprise.” It was a test flight (and a calculated publicity stunt) towards what he hoped might eventually become an aerial journey across the Atlantic. Wearing…

Visual Astronomy Display: June 2020

The Wolbach Library wishes good health to everyone during this unprecedented global crisis. Watch SpaceX’s Falcon9 lift off, the first commercial manned mission to space; Hubble has a new image of Saturn; No, scientists have not discovered a universe where time flows backward; But we do have a possible explanation…

Annie Jump Cannon and the Case of the Missing Columns

About a week ago we received two emails from volunpeer transcribers who have been working on Project PHaEDRA at the Smithsonian Transcription Center.  They both wrote to ask about the number of columns found on the right hand pages of several Annie Jump Cannon volumes, and it kicked off an…

Major Philip Sydney Coolidge (1830 – 1863)

On September 19, 1863, Major Philip Sidney Coolidge died leading the 16th U.S. Infantry into battle at Chickamauga, presumably. A great-grandson of Thomas Jefferson on his mother’s side, and a man who by all accounts lived “a strangely roving adventurous life,” Boston newspapers disagreed over his fate into the early…